Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Secrecy of the Battalion—What Brigham Knew




 
There was more to the Mormon Battalion then the raising of 500 men to help fight Uncle Sam’s battles, in fact, far more. I’m sure the Government was more than capable of taking care of the hostilities between the United States and Mexico. Did they really require the help of the Mormon pioneers? Hmmm . . . probably not. So why the Battalion, then? Brigham knew, and he also knew the price of not raising the men needed. What was the government hiding from the Saints?

a.        If Brigham refused to raise the Battalion, the U.S. Government was going to force the Saints back to Nauvoo

b.      If Brigham refused to raise the Battalion, the U.S. Government would wipe out the Saints.

c.       If Brigham refused to raise the Battalion, the U.S. Government would allow Mexico to retain Utah

d.      If Brigham refused raise the Battalion, the U.S. Government was going to force the Saints back to a "Mormon reservation" in Wisconsin

Yesterday’s answer:

a.      Disposable diapers

Carlyle Harmon, originally of Sugar City, Idaho, was the innovative scientist who helped newborns around the world break free of safety pins, rubber pants and reusable cloth diapers. Thanks to his discovery of a highly absorbent material, disposable diapers and other non-woven fiber fabrics were created and the world was forever changed. His 39 patents covered items that today are used in gowns, wipes, surgical/dental napkin covers, hygiene products and sheets used in homes and hospitals everywhere. Brother Harmon’s inspiration came from the study of single-cell amoeba. He observed that the amoeba had a remarkable capacity for absorbing liquids. Further research brought him the breakthroughs for which billions of babies, and their parents owe him a great debt of thanks—about 4-5 times a day, at least! Harmon worked for Johnson and Johnson, taught at BYU and founded the Eyring Research Institute. He died in 1997 at age 92.

Skousen, Paul, The Skousen Book of Mormon World Records, (Springville, Utah: Cedar Fort, Inc., 2004), 318.

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