Monday, June 23, 2014

It Wasn’t Possible at the Time, but it is Now

Image result for lds samuel and amanada chambers
Samuel and Amanda Chambers

Not understanding, there are those who look at our religion as restrictive. Yes, I agree, there are many do’s and don’ts, however, for the more spiritually mature, they realize that this long list of what to do and what not to do only adds to their freedom. Samuel and Amanda Chambers both joined the Church as slaves in the South. Eventually they gained their freedom and moved west to the Salt Lake Valley to enjoy life with the rest of the Saints. They found a freedom in the Church that they never experienced prior in their lives. What one thing could they own, that they couldn’t as slaves?

a.      Their membership records

b.      Callings in the Church

c.       Land

d.      Religious liberty

Yesterday’s answers:

1.                  (B) Platte

In the year of 1848, while crossing the plains, Eliza Marie Partridge Lyman named her new born son Platte (after the Platte River that the Saints had followed for so many days).

Kenneth W. Godfrey, Audrey M. Godfrey, and Jill Mulvay Derr, Women’s Voices: An Untold History of The Latter-day Saints 1830-1900 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1982), 247.


2.                  (D) Echo

The following from the pioneer journal of Patience Loader, a member of the Martin Handcart Company:

   I well remember that when we camped in Echo Canyon that Sister Squires was confined in the morning. She had a lovely baby girl and they named her Echo.

Kenneth W. Godfrey, Audrey M. Godfrey, and Jill Mulvay Derr, Women’s Voices: An Untold History of The Latter-day Saints 1830-1900 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1982), 241.


3.                  (A) Their daughter

The following from the life of pioneer Lucy Clements Hale:

   A second child, Martha Ann, was born June 20, 1846, in Nauvoo, not long before the family moved westward with the body of the Church. Many hardships awaited Lucy and James. Perhaps the hardest to bear was when their daughter Martha Ann was stolen by a band of Indians and carried away. The child would not be found, so the parents were forced to go westward without their beloved daughter. Their days were full of anxiety and loneliness, and each night they prayed for the safe return of their child. Lucy’s pillow was wet with tears each night and finally, from exhaustion, she would fall into a half sleep. Missionaries learned of their loss and promised to continue searching for Martha Ann; this they did for many months. One missionary made friends with an Indian brave and felt he could rely on his friendship in his search. After six months, Martha Ann was found in an Indian village. She was a beautiful child with jet black hair and deep brown eyes. When the Indians were asked why they had stolen the white child, the reply was, “She no white child. She Indian. Has black hair, black eyes. She stolen from Indian tribe.”

   Through the grace of God and the friendship between the Mormon missionaries and the Indian brave, Martha Ann was returned to her family. Lucy and James’s joy and relief were beyond expression as they held their child close to them and expressed gratitude for her safe return.

Chronicles of Courage, Lesson Committee comp., (Salt Lake City: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1991), 2:57-58.

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