Wednesday, October 18, 2017

“Utah’s Most Distinguished Daughter”

Image result for most distinguished young women
https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/b660bc0fb2d14d2eaa31c5b7a815dad29f7cdc79/c=0-0-960-722&r=x408&c=540x405/local/-/media/2017/04/04/MIGroup/Livonia/636269255358667148-dywoc.jpg
Who holds this honor?
a.                  Susa Young Gates
b.                  Marjorie Pay Hinckley
c.                   Emma Ray McKay
d.                  Miriam Angeline Work Young
Yesterday’s answer:
D.   Wolf  
.   From the life of William Bryan Pace:   At the Salt Lake Valley some of the Battalion found their families and relatives and they stopped. A company of thirty or forty under father, Lt. Pace, prepared to face the dangers of crossing the plains during the winter months. We had low supplies but hoped to get more at Fort Bridger. At Fort Bridger, we could not buy provisions and moved on with nothing to eat, depending on game after a journey of 900 miles. By scrimping we managed to get over on the Sweetwater where we killed a buffalo and fared sumptuously. We then encountered a severe snow storm, freezing nine mules to death. The storm covered up the grass and drove the buffaloes to the hills. With our jaded animals, we could not reach them. We ran across an old buffalo who was too old to go to the hills. He was killed, roasted, and fried over a fire made of buffalo chips dug from under eight inches of snow. After many days of starving and traveling in eight inches of snow, we reached the Platte River. Here we decided to kill a jaded donkey to draw the wolves for meat for our supper. It was so cold the donkey froze as quickly as the hide was off, and no wolves came. One of the men decided to try the donkey meat. He cut a piece and threw it on the fire. As soon as it was cooked they began to eat. After this experience, a mule was often had for supper, and no questions asked.
     The Platte River being partly frozen, we had a great deal of trouble to get over it. On the other side was a band of Pawnee Indians with which we made friends and feasted on corn, wild turkey, etc. From here to Winter Quarters on the Missouri, we had no trouble. We arrived a day or two before Christmas 1847.

Chronicles of Courage, Lesson Committee (Salt Lake City: Talon Printing, 1997), 8: 173.

No comments:

Post a Comment