Monday, November 20, 2017

After He Heard the Story

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After he heard the story of the Mormons camped on the banks of the Missouri River at Winter Quarters, Iowa, who dropped their law practice and immediately went to their aid?
a.                  Oliver Cowdery
b.                  Alexander Doniphan
c.                   Thomas Kane
d.                  Lilburn W. Boggs
Yesterday’s answer:
a.                  Visions
From the life of John Peter Sorensen:   A prominent Elder of the Twenty –first Ward, Salt Lake City, Utah, is the son of Peter Emil Sorensen and Ane Marie Jepsen, and was born Oct. 17, 1837, at Vestermark Kjar, near Sonderborg, on the island of Als, Denmark (now a part of Germany). In his youth he learned the trade of a ship carpenter, and at the age of nineteen he went to sea as such. On his numerous voyages he visited Norway, Sweden, Iceland, England, Italy, Russia, Prussia, Finland, Australia, New Zealand, etc. On Christmas Eve, 1859 he was shipwrecked in the English Channel, but mange to reach Margate, a small English seaport. In Australia, where he arrived in 1860, he engaged in gold mining, shipbuilding, and in teaching navigation; there, also, he obtained a fair knowledge of the English language. During the great gold excitement in New Zealand, in 1861 he went to that country, where he remained about nine years, following mining, boat building, contracting, merchandising, etc. He also spent much of this time prospecting for gold, with considerable success. In 1870 he started for Europe via America, but on reaching the Hawaiian Islands he remained at Honolulu about a year, where he experienced a server earthquake. He then went to California, whence he started overland for Europe, but on reaching Utah he decided to remain there. Consequently he located in Salt Lake City, where he reengaged in business and became part proprietor of the Valley House. At first he only paid slight attention to religious matters, but became a prominent member of the Freemasons, the Odd Fellows and the Knight of Pythias. Up to this time he had been a man of the world and was considered by his companions a “real good fellow.” But some time during the year 1878 he had a dream, in which he saw one of his children destroyed. The same night he passed into a trance, during which his spirit left the body, and he was privileged to behold many marvelous things, particularly the punishment of the wicked. Though his children were all well at the time, 36 hours later his eldest child was a corpse, in fulfilment of his dream. For three months after this event he had open visons and spiritual manifestations almost daily. He consulted Catholic priests and others, and fasted and prayed for relief; but none came, and no one seemed to understand him, except a few old members of the “Mormon” Church. After visiting and praying in the different sectarian churches he at length attended service in the 14th Ward meeting house, where his spiritual hearing was opened, and he heard the angels of God in voices of praise and rejoicing, when he entered the hall. Soon afterward, agreeable to his request, he was baptized by Wm. W. Taylor, April 1, 1879. In consequence of his joining the Church, he was expelled from the secret societies to which he had belonged.

Andrew Jenson, L.D.S Biographical Encyclopedia (Salt Lake City: Publishers Press, 1901) Vol. 1, 819-820.

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