Friday, November 24, 2017

Brigham’s Advice

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Brigham Young was never shy to offer his advice. The story is told of him seeing a man building his house. What did he tell the man he should do?
a.                  To double the thickness of the walls
b.                  To build out of adobe brick rather than logs
c.                   To move the living room window to the rear of the house
d.                  To place the chimney on the opposite end of the house
Yesterday’s answer:
(B)   Cattle
From the life of John McDonald:   In the spring of 1849, the family began their journey across the plains with three yoke of oxen, three yoke of cows and two wagons. They stopped at Kanesville during the following winter and in the spring of 1850 moved on to the Valley. His father died of cholera on this journey at the first crossing of the Platte river after being sick only one day. He dug a grave and assisted in burying a member of their company the morning previous to his death. After viewing the place where Salt Lake City now stands and its vicinity, it appeared that there was not sufficient feed to he had for their animals, so the subject of this sketch went on search a better pasture and found it in the bottom lands near where Lehi, Utah  county, is now located. He built a log house at the place now called Alpine and lived there during the winter of 1850 and 1851 then moved on to what is now Springville and lived there till 1866. He served in the Walker Indian war in 1853 as a cavalryman and with thirteen other men and eighty head of cattle he was sent by Pres. Brigham Young to make peace and conclude what is known in history as the Black Hawk war. This mission was a success. These agents met the Indians in the Ashely valley and after several days’ discussion peace was declared; no formal battle has ever taken place since that time between whites and these Indians. 

Andrew Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia (Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1914), 11.

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