Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The First Ensign

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Today we as members of the Church enjoy the Ensign. In it we read the words of the prophets and apostles and serves to strengthen our testimonies. The Ensign we read today wasn’t the first. When did the first publication with Ensign in its title almost first appear (that’s right, it never published)?
a.                  1841
b.                  1830
c.                   1869
d.                  1922
Yesterday’s answer:
D. A whip
The first trail incident occurred in the Brigham Young vanguard pioneer company of 1847 and involved fighting with a whip. According to Thomas Bullock, one morning in June as the Vanguard Company was preparing to pack for another day of travel, he was approached by George Brown, who told him that “Captains orders” were to make sure the cattle were safe.
“I told him I would go myself as quick as I could put the things away, which took me about 5 or 10 minutes at the outside. I then started after the Cattle, saw them all, & then met G. Brown & told him I had seen them all—he asked why I had not gone when he told me—‘instead of idling & fooling away your time half an hour.’ I replied, ‘O Good God, what a lie, if you say I have been idling or fooling half an hour’. . . . he then struck me with his Whip. Saying ‘I am ready for a fight, for I’d as leave fight as not. I said ‘you shall hear of this again. For I shall tell the Dr.’, he up with his fist to strike me, saying ‘You may tell the Dr. as soon as you like’. But I got out of the reach of his arm, & so avoided another blow. George Brown has lied to, and about the Lord’s anointed many times, I have been more abused, & reviled. By him, than any other person, he has now struck me with his whip. And I now pray that the Lord God of Israel may reward him according to his evil deeds, & punish him until he repent & forsake his evil ways.”

Violence and Disruptive Behavior on the Difficult Trail to Utah, 1847-1868, David L. Clark (BYU Studies, Vol. 53, Number 4, 2014), 92.

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