Sunday, March 25, 2018

The United Order

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Where wasn’t the United Order practiced?
a.                  Kirtland, Ohio
b.                  Nauvoo, Illinois
c.                   Winter Quarters, Nebraska
d.                  Orderville, Utah
Yesterday’s answer:
C   In California at the time of the Gold Rush mission
The Mormon mission to the Sandwich Islands arose from the gold fields of California. Ten young Mormons, the most prominent being George Q. Cannon, future Apostle and member of the Church’s First Presidency were called to leave their hunt for treasure and open up a mission in the Sandwich Islands. They accepted their calls and sailed from San Francisco, landing in Honolulu on December 12, 1850. The day following their arrival, the young missionaries climbed a hill outside of the city, improvised an altar, sang a hymn, and offered a prayer for the success of their mission.
The missionaries began their proselyting on the assumption that they were to work among the Island’s white people, and for weeks they labored with little or no success. Eventually, under these frustrating circumstances, five of the missionaries left the mission. Four of them returned to the United States, while a fifth decided on his own initiative to switch his mission to Tahiti.
As the five remaining missionaries evaluated their situation, they felt that their mission was not to be primarily among the “haoles” (whites) but among the native Hawaiians. This recognition imposed upon them the tasks of learning the very difficult Hawaiian language and becoming accustomed to living among the natives. The chief advocate of this change was the youngest of the missionaries, George Q. Cannon. Once moving in this direction, the tiny mission saw success.
Two Early Missionaries in Hawaii, Mercy Partridge Whitney and Edward Partridge Jr., Scott H. Partridge, BYU Studies Vol. 52, No. 1, 2013,, 141.


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