Thursday, November 21, 2019

Almost Leaving her Behind


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Too poor to bring the entire family, what was the miracle that allowed six year old Agnes McGregor to cross the ocean with her parents in 1852?
a.                  Her father finding a purse with the needed money
b.                  The first year of the Perpetual Emigration Fund
c.                   Brigham Young sending money to the family
d.                  The ship captain allowing her to sail for free
Yesterday’s answer:
A   Car saleswoman
From the life of Pauline Mary Williamson Clinger:   Pauline Mary’s parents were early converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Brevik area of Norway. Pauline was baptized November 20, 1859.
Their family sailed on the ship, “Humboldt,” on June 2, 1866. They came with Andrew H. Scott Wagon Train arriving in Salt Lake City, October 8, 1866. The family moved directly to the Provo area.
Mary found work in a home where the people were kind to her and helped her learn English.
On February 9, 1868, she married James Henry Clinger whom she met the first night she was in the Provo area.
Their first home, which was a log cabin, was destroyed by fire. Mary and James Henry built their next home in 1873. Mary had some responsibility for the building of the south part of the home because James Henry had gone with A. K. Thurber and others to Grass Valley (Sevier County) in 1873, with an exploring party.
In addition to the farm where they first lived, Mary and James Henry homesteaded an area northeast of the family home. When a longtime friend of the Clinger family passed away, Mary used the inheritance this friend left her to send her husband to Norway on a mission to preach the restored Gospel. The balance of the money was used to buy more land.
Mary operated the farm with the help of her children and hired help while her husband was on his mission. Mary continued to be the manager of the farm when James Henry returned from his mission and she became a saleswoman for Consolidated Wagon and Machine Company and a car saleswoman.
Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude, Daughters of Utah Pioneers: (International Society Daughters of Utah Pioneers: 1998), 1: 620-621.

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